Creative Carte Blanche: Winged Things

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Happy summer, friends! We’re in the midst of our June Creative Adventure over at the Creative Carte Blanche blog, and this month’s hostess, Susan Mostek, challenged us (and you!) to share a piece for the theme “Winged Things.”

I’ve always been drawn to origami cranes, but have only vaguely understood the meaning behind them. Then, my beloved mom got sick, and when Dad and I took her to treatment I noticed a basket of paper cranes, folded by local school children as a gift for the patients. Curious, I did a little research and found this quick read from National Geographic. Turns out, the origami crane’s legend as a symbol of hope and healing began with a young victim of the Hiroshima bombing named Sadako Sasaki.

Much like tying knots in a prayer quilt, the act of folding a crane while focusing loving thoughts is believed to be healing for the spirit. Young Sadako folded 1,000 of them during her short life, and her legacy has inspired many others to view this simple craft as a force for good in the world.

With so much uncertainty surrounding us, I think we could all use a few paper cranes in our lives. 🙂

Wings of Hope

Step 1: Fold an origami crane. I used an 8″ square piece of lavender paper from an inexpensive package of origami paper from the craft store. If you haven’t folded a paper crane before, click here for a great video tutorial.CCB.0616.01

Step 2: Cut a 5″ x 7″ piece of white cardstock. Using Sap Green Archival Ink, stamp a background using the Fireworks stamp from Seth Apter’s “Lineups” set.
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Step 3: Isn’t this a cool pattern? I love the soft green shade, too. Set this piece aside for now.
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Step 4. My friend May Flaum has a beautiful line of embellishments called “28 Lilac Lane,” which includes color-coordinated collections of buttons, pearls, beads, and sequins. I’m using her “On Lilac” set here, along with some pretty teal samples she was kind enough to give me. CCB.0616.04

Step 5: Thread some pretty twine through a favorite button and tie it in a knot. Repeat with four other pretty buttons.CCB.0616.05

Step 6: Choose five colorful paper flowers (or die cut your own). I got this tin from Michael’s.
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Step 7: Use Ranger Glossy Accents to attach a threaded button to the center of each paper flower. Set these aside to dry.
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Step 8: Cut a piece of sage green metallic cardstock to 5.25″ x 7.25″. Attach the stamped cardstock onto this piece using your favorite adhesive, making sure it’s centered so the green creates an equal, thin border on all four sides.CCB.0616.08

Step 9: Place foam adhesive dots on the back of your paper crane.
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Step 10: Attach foam dots to the back of each flower, stacking some two or three dots deep to create dimension.
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Step 11: Arrange your crane and flowers onto the cardstock. Glue on a few matching pearls, too!
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Step 12: Adhere an uplifting word from Tim Holtz’s Idea-ology Big Chat Stickers.
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Step 13: Using tweezers, Glossy Accents and a steady hand, give your crane a shiny bead eye.
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Step 14: Cut a piece of white cardstock to 12″ x 8″ and fold it in half to make a card that’s 6″ wide by 8″ tall. Using the Broken Tile stamp from Seth Apter’s Faded Fragments set and Jet Black Archival Ink, randomly stamp the pattern around the perimeter of the card.
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Step 15: You don’t need to fill in the center. Let the ink dry.
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Step 16: Attach the flowered panel to the folded card using your favorite adhesive.CCB.0616.16

And, there you have it!

Thanks for visiting today, and may peace and hope be your companions. Please join us at Creative Carte Blanche for our Winged Things challenge, which is open through June.

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